Dust Collection and Valves Blog

Should I Test My Dust for Explosibility? | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Mar 15, 2021 8:45:00 AM

This is one of the most important questions you can ask. The answer to this question can require you to invest in expensive protection equipment or not, but that is much better than the loss of thousands of dollars in equipment, production time, and most importantly, employee safety. There are a few ways to answer this question. Some of which are safer than others. The main question you will need to ask yourself, is the dust combustible?

Is My Dust Explosive?

If the material can react with oxygen then there is a chance it can be explosive. However, just because it is combustible, doesn’t mean it is explosive. Generally if a dust is greater than 500 micron in size, it is not explosive. However, what if the dust is smaller than 500 microns?

The safest course is to send your sample into a test facility for a simple Explosibility Screening (Go/ No Go) test. This test will take a small sample and try to ignite it to see if the sample will explode. If it explodes then an explosion severity test should be performed, which provides data on the speed of the explosion (Kst) and strength of the explosion (Pmax). This data is very important to designing equipment that will prevent, contain, or divert explosions safely.

Some dust might be generated from material you got from a vendor, and they might have already done explosion testing on the material. You might be able to use this data for the design of your equipment depending on the process. The main thing being, what are you doing with your process? If you are sorting, grinding, drying, etc. the material then you can be changing the explosibility of the dust. If there has been a change, then the material should be tested again or you can assume it to be explosive and use the suitable published data.

The Explosibility of Dust

The explosibility of dust is highly dependent on the material size and humidity. A few examples would be aluminum. Spirals of aluminum from trimming wouldn’t be explosive, but a fine aluminum powder would be. Another example is wood dust. Dry wood dust is very explosive, while wood with a high water content is not.

You should not depend on your history working with the dust, because dust explosions are fickle. You might be working with dust for 20 years and have no issues and then suddenly there is an explosion. Or it might be the 1st time you work with a dust that an explosion happens. One thing is for sure, if you have had flash fires with the dust, you definitely should have it test for explosibility. A flash fire is a sign that you have an issue with your process and should do further investigation to make sure you won’t have an explosion and to prevent more flash fires.

Dust Hazard Analysis (DHA)

If your dust is explosive, you will then need to have a Dust Hazard Analysis (DHA) done on your process/ building, etc. The DHA reviews your process, operational and maintenance procedures, equipment, etc.   It then provides procedures, equipment changes, etc. to address the issues and provide for a safe process. OSHA will request a copy of your DHA during any inspection. So it is important that you have an answer to the question “Is my dust explosive?” and have something to back up the answer in case you are asked by OSHA, your insurance company, local fire inspector, etc.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



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Topics: dust collector, combustible dust, horizontal cyclone, GPC Cyclone, explosive dust, Dust Collector filters

Dust Collector Frequently Asked Questions: Part 2 | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Feb 26, 2021 10:15:00 AM

What are the benefits of using a cyclone as pre-filter for a baghouse / cartridge collector?

If you are working with a high value material or product, have high maintenance costs to the baghouse/cartridge collector, or want to avoid cross-contamination, then you should investigate using a cyclone ahead of your baghouse or cartridge collector. The cyclone will allow you to recover the dust without contamination from the filters. The filters in a baghouse or cartridge collector use a dust layer built up on the filters to collect the dust from the airstream. During the process of filter cleaning, dust from this layer is dislodged and falls into the hopper. Any particulate from prior batches can cause contamination of the dust.

A cyclone, on the other hand, collects the dust and deposits it in the hopper continuously. There is very little dust buildup inside of a cyclone. This minimizes the chances of contamination from prior batches. Since there aren’t any filters, a cyclone can be washed or wiped out to remove the prior batch particles.

How does ductwork affect my system?

Ductwork is usually by far the largest component and often the most overlooked. Depending on the size of your system, the ductwork can span hundreds of feet and have dozens of side streams. The ductwork is like railroad tracks, it moves the dusty air from one place to another.

Often times, additional lines will be added to a dust collector system after installation. Without proper evaluation of the system, this could negatively affect the performance of the whole system.

This means that just because the dust collector system was operating correctly before, it might not after an additional pickup point or hood is added. What happens is that when you add additional pickup points, you change the balancing of the system. This could change the airflow to each and every hood and pickup point in the system, so while the system was originally adequately venting an area, it might not after a change.

A few things can be done to address this, such as changing fan speed, adding dampers, modifying ductwork, etc. The main thing you need to keep in mind is that if you slow the airflow through ductwork too much, you begin to build up dust within the line. This will further restrict your airflow and it can become a fire / explosion hazard.



Airlocks FAQ Volume 1

Airlock valves are important components in many dust collection and process systems, yet they are often overlooked. We hope this helps you choose your next airlock.

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Topics: dust collector, pre-filter cyclone, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters

Top 5 Questions to Ask When Considering A Cyclone Dust Collector

Posted by Tom Hobson on Feb 19, 2021 10:15:33 AM

Designing a dust collection system can be quite a daunting task. With so many collector options and so many application variables to consider, it is difficult to know where to begin. Cyclones are among the oldest and still most reliable methods of dust collection available. Because they require very little maintenance, have low up-front cost, and offer unmatched versatility, cyclone collectors remain a viable solution to many air-handling challenges. Although heightened environmental regulations and collection efficiency needs have shifted industry toward the use of filter-media collectors, cyclonic dust collection still plays a vital role in many air-handling systems. These five questions will help determine if a cyclone dust collector is right for your application.IMG_0688

  1. How big is my dust?

    Cyclonic dust collection relies on inertial forces to separate dust particles from an air stream. The larger and denser the particulate is, the greater its inertia. This is the reason cyclones have such high collection efficiencies when handling relatively large dust particles.

  2. How much dust is too much?

    Grain loading or dust loading refers to the amount of dust particulate that is suspended in a gas stream. This is typically measured in the number of grains per cubic foot of gas. This is an important number to consider when designing a pollution control system. Not only will this factor into the size requirement of a dust collector, but it will also determine the appropriate type of dust collector. The strict air pollution control standards in the United States often necessitate a “filter-media” dust collector, such as a bag house, for the final collection stage.

  3. Can I reuse the dust I am collecting? Particle Size

    Dust generated by handling dry bulk materials can be hazardous but also valuable. Unfortunately, most filter-type dust collection systems are designed for disposal rather than product reclamation. Filter media collectors such as cartridge filters and bag houses often do not allow collected particulates to be recovered for reuse due to contamination or particulate size issues.

  4. Do I have heat or humidity concerns?

    Air handling in manufacturing processes is often a delicate balance with a number of variables to contend with. Process heat and humidity in the air stream create a difficult challenge when it comes to dust collection. Collection of red-hot dust particulate is simply not possible with many bag houses because cotton filters are flammable and flame retardant filters can be costly.
  5. How much should I spend?

    Perhaps the most important and most difficult question asked when designing a dust collection system is how much to spend. The simple answer is, it depends. It depends on what the overall goal of the system should achieve. The best dust collection systems are those that were designed with several functions in mind: capacity, operation costs, maintenance costs, and product/ material value.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



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Topics: dust, dust collector, cleaning baghouse filter, horizontal cyclone, GPC Cyclone, splitScream Cyclone, Dust Collector filters, arirflow

Pneumatic vs Motorized Double Dump Valves | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jan 29, 2021 9:45:00 AM

Double dump valves are available in both motorized and pneumatic actuation. To figure out which would be better for you we need to consider your application. A double dump valve is really two (2) valves with flapper plates in series controlled by the same mechanism. At least one of the flapper plates is closed at all time. The main things we need to know are the pressure, temperature, and flow rates along with the area classification the double dump valve will go in.

Motorized Double Dump Valve

A motorized double dump valve uses a cam rotated by a motor and gearbox to open and close each of the dump valves in series. The cam is designed so that at least one valve is closed at all time, thereby providing an airlock. The cam also provides a certain amount of cycles each minute, which controls the amount of material that is available to pass through the valve.

Pneumatic Double Dump Valve

A pneumatic double dump valve uses one pneumatic cylinder on each dump valve to control the operation of it. A timer is used to control the cylinders. The timer cycles cylinders so that one valve is closed at all times.

Differences Between Pneumatic and Motorized Double Dump Valve

Pressure - Motorized double dump valves are limited in the amount of pressure they can handle. The cam drive doesn’t provide direct force on the flap plates. This means that higher pressures and weights will push the flap plate open. The pneumatic valve, however, provides direct pressure on the flap plate so it can handle higher pressures and weights.

Temperature – A motorized double dump valve has a gearbox and motor located next to the housing of the valve. At higher temperatures, this can cause issues with the grease in the gearbox and motor. Also, the cam drive uses wear plates that might degrade faster at higher temperatures. The pneumatic valve, however, can be supplied with high temperature seals on the pneumatic cylinder.

Material Flow Rates – Unlike a rotary valve, which is continuously passing material through, double dump valves fill one chamber while emptying the other. This significantly cuts down on the flow rate through the valve. A motorized double dump valve size is limited due to the cam design. A spool piece cannot easily be installed to increase the volumetric flow through each chamber. While with a pneumatic design, each flap plate is controlled by its own pneumatic cylinder, a spool piece can easily be installed to allow additional material to flow through.

Area Classifications – The electrical classification of the area the valve is being installed can also effect the valve selection. A pneumatic valve has very few electric parts and can be designed to be intrinsically safe. A motorized unit has an electric motor, so the motor must be selected to for the area classification.

When selecting the best double dump valve for your application, look at the pressure, temperature, material flow rate, and area classification.


 

To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


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Topics: dust collector, double dump valve, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

How Do I Extend the Life of My Filters? | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jan 27, 2021 3:15:00 PM

Dust collection filters such as the bags in baghouses, cartridges in cartridge collectors, and HEPA filters all filter out dust particles by collecting them in between their fibers. Dust builds up on the bags and cartridges to form a filter cake over the filter further restricting the ability of dust particles and airflow to pass through the filter. This restricting of airflow causes a pressure drop (resistance) which is directly related to the amount of dust built up on the filters. As the pressure drop increases, the airflow through the collector will decrease. Most baghouses and cartridge collectors have cleaning cycles which remove some of the dust from the filters keeping the pressure drop low.

The cleaning process on the filters usually consists of blowing higher pressure air through the filters, thereby causing it to expand slightly. This knocks off some of the top layer(s) of the filter cake which lowers the pressure drop through the filters. Other units have the filters connected to a mechanical shaking system. The airflow through the filter will be stopped during the cleaning process. The mechanical shaker system will gently shake the filters dislodging the dust to fall into the hopper.

Even with these cleaning functions, the filters will eventually plug up and significantly decrease the amount of air they allow to pass. This will starve the pickup points of airflow, allowing dust to escape and never enter the collection system. Depending on the application, this can happen within months or years of putting in new filters. The process of replacing the filters usually requires the system to be turned off. Cartridge collectors are usually easier to replace than bag, but either way the time and labor it takes to change are significant.

Ways to Extend Filter Life

It is therefore very advantageous to extend the time between filter replacements. The following are a few ways to extend filter life.

  • Install a pre-filter before the dust collector. The greater the concentration of dust getting to the filter, the faster the filter will plug up or fail. So if you can lower the dust concentration, you will extend the life of the filters. Pre-filters include cyclones and dropout boxes. Pre-filters remove most of the larger particles, leaving only the smallest to be handled by the filters.
  • Install pulse-on-demand controllers. A pulse-on-demand controller monitors the pressure drop across the filters. And when the pressure drop gets too high, the unit will activate the cleaning process until the pressure drop falls below a shutoff point. This extends life by preventing unnecessary cleaning of filters which can cause holes to develop in the filters. It also can save money on compressed air and keep the airflow within desired range.
  • Install different filters. Not all filters are the same. Some filters are designed to minimize issues with wet dust. Others have higher temperature ratings so they won’t degrade. If you are replacing filters too often, contact your filter supplier or system manufacturer to see if there are other filters that are more suitable. These special filters are more expensive, so it might be prudent to look at adding a pre-filter and pulse-on-demand controller to extend life even further at the same time.
  • If you are plugging up the filters with hygroscopic dust, check the collector housing for leaks that might allow humidity into it. Also, check the compressed air supply to make sure humidity isn’t being added to the system.
  • Install insulation on the dust collector if you have high humidity. Insulation will help prevent water vapor from condensing at night or during winter, thereby preventing water droplets from damaging the filters or causing dust to plug up in the filters.
  • Install a spark arrester before the dust collector. Depending on the process being vented, sparks can be pulled into the dust collector which, thereby cause the filters to catch on fire. Installing a spark arrester prevents this. Often times a pre-filter (cyclone or dropout box) provide the same protection.

If you are replacing filters too often then think about making some of the above changes to your system next time you are due to replace filters. That way you can extend your filter life and operate for longer periods of time without maintenance.

 


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

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Topics: dust collector, cleaning baghouse filter, horizontal cyclone, GPC Cyclone, splitScream Cyclone, Dust Collector filters, arirflow

How to Clean Various Dust Collectors | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Nov 30, 2020 9:45:00 AM

When you have a dust collector capturing valuable material, you often have to regularly clean the dust collector to remove the material and if it is perishable, remove it before it contaminates the other material. Some dust collectors are easier to clean than others.

Wet Scrubbers

Wet Scrubbers are pretty much self-cleaning. Since they use water to capture the dust, it pretty much washes the walls and internals regularly. The main issue with wet scrubbers are that if you are trying to use the material (whether in the process or as a product) then you will need to remove it from the water stream (unless having it in a water stream is desirable).

Cyclones

Cyclones are very low maintenance. Since they use centrifugal motion to remove the material, there isn’t much buildup inside the cyclone. So there really aren’t many places to build up. Designing the vessel with access doors will help keep the cleaning easy. Aerodyne’s horizontal cyclone has a unique design that allows you access to the whole cyclone through its back plate.

Fabric Filters

Fabric filters collect the material on the filters (bags/ cartridges). This builds up a layer of material which remains on it for the life of the filter. During cleaning, the material falling off might have recently been captured or material that has been on the filter for an extended period of time. This could contaminate the material being collected.

  1. Baghouses require the bag to be removed in order to be cleaned or replaced. Often times this is a very time consuming process and can often require workers to enter the baghouse. If contamination is a serious concern, baghouses should not be used.
  2. Cartridge collectors are much easier with replacing the cartridges. Often times this can be done in minutes compared to hours of a baghouse. So you can remove the cartridges, clean them and re-install. This will allow you to clean or replace the filters after each batch, thereby minimizing any contamination.

One option is to install a cyclone dust collector as a pre-filter before your baghouse or cartridge collector. The cyclone will capture the majority of the material without contaminating it for use in your process / product. While the smallest fines will then be captured in the baghouse / cartridge collector for disposal or treatment. This allows you to capture as much of your valuable material with minimal cleaning / contamination while also providing the high removal efficiency for the environment.


5 Signs Your Dust Collection System Needs a Pre-Filter

Watch the video from the Dust Efficiency Clinic discusses how using a pre-filter will optimize your dust collection system. 

Watch Video

 

If you prefer this valuable information in white paper form, get our whitepaper, Top 5 Reasons to Use a Cyclone as a Pre-filter.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

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Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

Dust Collector Frequently Asked Questions: Part 1 | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Oct 30, 2020 9:15:00 AM

What information do I need to size my dust collector?

The attached Questionnaire will provide most of the questions that would be asked for a dust collector. The information that absolutely must be provided for a dust collector to be sized and quoted are:

  1. What is the airflow through the dust collector?
  2. What is the temperature and pressure the dust collector will experience?
  3. What is the dust being collected?
  4. Is it explosive?
  5. What removal efficiency do you require?

The five above will allow a supplier to provide a quote. However, with only the above information, the dust collector performance cannot be guaranteed.

See dust collector questionnaire.

Is my dust explosive?

To help answer this question, NFPA has released NFPA-652 and 654. A combustible dust is defined as a finely divided combustible particulate solid that presents a flash fire or explosion hazard when suspended in air or the process-specific oxidizing medium over a range of concentrations.

Basically, what this means is when the dust is in the air and its concentration is enough to cause a flash fire or propagate a deflagration or explosion if exposed to a spark or heat source, then it’s considered combustible. Continue Reading.


Airlocks FAQ Volume 1

Airlock valves are important components in many dust collection and process systems, yet they are often overlooked. We hope this helps you choose your next airlock.

Get FAQ Now


5 Common Mistakes When Selecting a Dust Collector

The video presents a quick, do-it-yourself examination that helps identify symptoms of possible inefficient dust collection.

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To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com

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Topics: dust collector, pre-filter cyclone, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters

How History and Dust Collection Mirror Each Other | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Aug 26, 2020 10:00:00 AM

The saying goes that “Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it” and this is true of dust collection too.

Dust collections systems are often seen as an install and forget equipment. You turn it on and then do maintenance when you need to. However, the system was designed for a specific system or piece of equipment. This means the hoods, duct-work, airflow, dust collector, etc. are all taken into account in the design.

Then over time, equipment in the system is changed, repaired, optimized, etc. Additional pickup points are added and/or removed, filters are changed, process conditions change, new products are made and/or new components are used in the process. All of this can change the operation of the dust collector system. Anytime something changes in the dust collector system, the system should be reviewed to make sure it is still operating as required.

At this time, the change should be noted in the system manual so that in the future when another change is done or the system isn’t operating as required, the information is readily available. If the information isn’t noted on the system, history will be repeated in that the whole system will have to be re-designed to figure out what airflow is required and where the issues are. This will end up taking more time, and if the proper data isn’t available, could cause further issues down the line.


Solutions Sourcebook

Learn how industrial dust collectors and material handling valves can help your application.

 

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5 Common Mistakes When Selecting a Dust Collector

The video presents a quick, do-it-yourself examination that helps identify symptoms of possible inefficient dust collection.

Watch Video

 


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com

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Topics: dust collector, pre-filter cyclone, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters

What Advantages Do Cyclones Provide Dust Collector Systems? | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jul 29, 2020 9:30:00 AM

Cyclone pre-filters offer multiple advantages to existing dust collection systems. They lower the dust loading going into the dust collector, thereby allowing them to concentrate on the smallest particles. Here we will discuss the benefits for both wet collectors and dry collectors.

Wet Scrubbers

Wet Scrubbers – cyclones remove the particulate before the particles see the liquid. Wet scrubbers use liquid (often times water) to capture the dust. The water droplet surrounds the particulate, thereby increasing the particle size of the particle so it is easier to collect. Once the particulate is in the water droplet, it falls into the scrubber sump and is removed from the air-stream. The problem is that as more and more droplets enter the sump tank, a slurry is formed and will require a blow-down to prevent plugging up the nozzles, pump and packing, etc. This requires adding additional liquid and removing slurry.

Benefits of Cyclone Pre-Filter on Wet Scrubbers

By installing the cyclone pre-filter, you are decreasing the amount of particulate entering the wet scrubber. This means less particles will be in the sump tank, lowering the amount in the slurry and requiring less blowdown. This decreases the amount of liquid you need to add to the system. Lowering the blowdown rate also decreases the cost to treat the blowdown liquid. The blowdown slurry is often sent to a waste water treatment facility (facility or municipal). Each gallon of blowdown must be treated so that it doesn’t contaminate the ecosystem. This additional cost is often forgotten about when evaluating a wet scrubber.

Fabric Filters

Fabric filters (baghouses, cartridge collectors, HEPA filters) – Cyclone pre-filters provide many benefits for fabric filters. Fabric filters work by building up a dust layer which then lets air pass, but not dust particles. As the layer gets thicker it is harder for air to pass through.   Baghouses and cartridge collectors often clean the filters periodically by blowing compressed air in them, causing the filters to expand and shake off the top layers of dust.

Benefits of Cyclone Pre-Filter on Fabric Filters

The cyclone pre-filter minimizes the amount of dust coming to the filters. They also collect the largest dust, only allowing the fine dust to get to the filters. The fine particles will then more evenly collect on the filters.   The lower dust loading mean that the filters will not require as much cleaning which extends the life of the filters. Since the filters are cleaned by blowing compressed air into them, the expansion will eventually cause tears. And over time, less and less particulate will fall off as dust works its way into the filter.

Filters also have issues with certain type of dusts. Dust that is sticky and hygroscopic can cause filters to plug up faster, especially if there is humidity in the area. Abrasive dust can cause premature holes in the filters and those holes in the filter allow dust to pass through the collector and out into the environment. Again, by minimizing the dust going to the filter, you extend the filter life and minimize the possibility of filters plugging.

The other big savings is that by installing a pulse-on-demand controller, with a cyclone pre-filter, you will be able to control your cleaning cycles. Therefore, you will only clean the filters when it’s needed. This will save your filters and minimize your plant air usage.

The other benefit that cyclones provide is that they capture the dust before it reaches the filters. Since the filters have a dust layer at all times, the dust that is collected is contaminated by all dust that it has seen before in the life of the filters. If the material you are collecting is expensive, perishables or are controlled substances (pharmaceutical manufacturing), then collecting in a baghouse could cause issues due to contamination from the filters. The cyclone will collect the material and can be easily cleaned between batches.


Top 5 Reasons to Use a Cyclone as a Pre-Filter Whitepaper

Find out ow pre-filters help to extend bag or filter life, and improving removal efficiencies.

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How the Aerodyne SplitStream Cyclone Works

The SplitStream Cyclone Collector is designed for dust collection systems where tough dust like abrasive, sticky, fibrous, hygroscopic or granular persist. 

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To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com

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Topics: dust collector, pre-filter cyclone, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters

Dust Collector: Signs You Need a Pre-Filter | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on May 27, 2020 9:04:42 AM

Many dust collectors spend their time operating far below their potential.  Whether the system was designed incorrectly, the process has changed, slow maintenance, or a combination of these, the dust collector isn’t operating at its finest.    One possible solution is to install a pre-filter before your dust collector to help your dust collector to be all it can be!

The following are some signs that your dust collector isn’t operating up to par and you should look at installing a cyclone pre-filters

Filter Collectors (baghouse, cartridge collector, HEPA filters, etc.)

  1. There is a high pressure drop across your filters. This is caused by the dust building up on the filters and not being cleaned off fast enough.  The high pressure drop causes the fan to pull less air to compensate, thereby letting more dust out on to the shop floor.
  2. Filters are being replaces too fast! The most common filter failures are by developing holes or plugging up.  Both failures are tied to high dust loadings. 
     
    1. One of the ways holes develop is filter cleaning. Pulse-jet dust collectors use high pressure air blown down through the center of the filter to expand the filter off its support structure.  When the pressure disappears the filter returns to its normal size, causing the top layer(s) of dust to fall off the filter.  This regular expansion and contraction will cause holes and tears in the fabric, which then let unfiltered air and dust through the unit. 
    2. Plugging of the filters happens with “Tough” dust or a deficiency of cleaning of the filters. As the filters plug up, the removal efficiency will actually get better because very little air will get through, but this will cause dust to escape from the pickup points  as less and less air is pulled through the system.  So the dust collector system will not be doing the job it is supposed to do.
  3. Valuable product or raw material is being disposed in the dust collector waste due to contamination. As stated above, filters build up dust layers to provide the removal efficiency.  Those filters will retain the material over time.  If the material is valuable, this can be a lot of money that is going to waste.  Pre-filters will allow the material to be collected and used in the process or product before it can be contaminated in the filters.

Wet Scrubbers

  1. Do you have a high cost of water treatment and disposal of the scrubber blowdown? When wet scrubbers capture particulate, slurry is formed.  This slurry will then have to be disposed.  It will often be sent to a water treatment plant.  The water treatment plant might be dedicated to the facility or municipal.  Either way, additional costs are added to treat the slurry before it is disposed of or reused.  These costs are usually much more than disposing of dry material.  One reason being that dry material weighs much less because there isn’t any water added and the other being that regulations prevent slurries from being put into landfills, etc.  A pre-filter removes a portion of the material before it is put into slurry, thereby saving costs on waste water treatment.
  2. Similar to above, since wet scrubbers form slurries, any valuable material collected in the wet scrubber will be in that slurry. So unless the desired state of the material is within the slurry, it will have to be processed to make it useful.  This means additional steps (and expense) are required to recycle the material.  A cyclone pre-filter removes the material dry, before it is in slurry, thereby saving costs.

So before you decide to purchase a new dust collector, look into the benefits of installing a cyclone pre-filter.  You just might save yourself money!


5 Signs Your Dust Collection System Needs a Pre-Filter

Watch the video from the Dust Efficiency Clinic discusses how using a pre-filter will optimize your dust collection system. 

Watch Video

 


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

 

 

Read More

Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

Aerodyne Environmental: Home of the Horizontal Cyclone and  Vacu-Valve® Airlock Valve

Inspired To Be Different.

At Aerodyne, we choose to take a different approach to collecting dust and handling materials. Our cyclones are unique in design to address common issues such as problematic dusts and space constraints. Our airlocks are chosen to fit your specific application instead of hastily installing traditional equipment options. We believe that when we see things differently, we can solve problems effectively. That's why so many people turn to us for help in solving their tough dust problems.

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