Dust Collection and Valves Blog

How To Determine the Cost of a Cyclone - Part 3 | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Mar 23, 2020 1:25:20 PM

When selecting the cyclone for a dust collection process, there are different factors affecting sizing and cost of the cyclone.  The cyclone should be sized to compliment the airflow of the system and the required dust removal efficiency.  Process conditions will dictate suitable materials of construction as well as any special design requirements.

Part 3: Materials of Construction

Cyclone costs are largely dependent on the materials of construction.  They can be constructed of materials from plastics to special alloys such a Hastelloy or Monel.  The materials of construction should be selected based on the process requirements more than costs. 

These requirements include chemical and corrosion resistance, industry standards, and cleanability. Plastic cyclones are not really suitable for most industrial applications.  They can provide low cost dust control for garage woodworking shops and can be used in wet applications, but they don’t usually last long in dry applications and can have issues with static electricity.

The following chart shows relative costs for cyclones based on the material of construction.

 


5 Signs Your Dust Collection System Needs a Pre-Filter

Watch the video from the Dust Efficiency Clinic discusses how using a pre-filter will optimize your dust collection system. 

Watch Video

 

If you prefer this valuable information in white paper form, get our whitepaper, Top 5 Reasons to Use a Cyclone as a Pre-filter.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

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Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

How To Determine the Cost of a Cyclone - Part 2 | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Feb 24, 2020 9:45:00 AM

When selecting the best cyclone for your process, there are many different factors that affect the sizing and cost of the cyclone.  The cyclone must be sized so that it handles the airflow of the system and components.  The proper design for the required removal efficiency must be used.  The process will also dictate the materials of construction and special requirements.  The location where the cyclone will be installed will influence the cyclone orientation.  Cyclones aren’t a stand-alone piece of equipment; support equipment is required for proper operation.  Therefore, the scope of supply will affect the cyclone costs and design.  The following is a brief description of the different elements that affect cyclone sizing and pricing.

Part 2: Dust Removal Efficiency

The main purpose of a cyclone is to remove material from the airstream.  A cyclone will remove a certain percentage of material based on the size of the material.  The larger the material, the higher the removal efficiency of the material will be.  The density of the material also plays a part in the removal efficiency.  Heavier material will see greater removal efficiency. 

Faster air velocity in the cyclone will create greater centrifugal motion and a greater force pushing the material out towards the walls.  What this means is the higher your pressure drop through the cyclone, the greater the removal efficiency will be.  (Assuming the pressure drop isn’t from a badly designed cyclone inlet and outlet) The chart below shows the removal efficiency of a GPC-24 at different pressure drops with material having a specific gravity of 1.0.

Please note the particle shape will also affect the removal efficiency.  Spherical material is the easiest to predict while abnormal shapes are the hardest to predict.    The above chart assumes a spherical dust.

When selecting the cyclone size, you will have to balance the requirement for the highest removal efficiency against the lowest pressure drop.  A smaller cyclone for a specific airflow will provide greater removal efficiency with a lower cyclone cost, but higher operational costs (larger fan due to larger pressure drop).

Specially designed cyclones are available that will increase the material removal efficiency.  Ex. Aerodyne manufactures the SplitStream cyclone.  These special cyclones are more expensive than standard cyclones but usually can provide higher removal efficiency and other benefits beyond standard cyclones.


 

5 Signs Your Dust Collection System Needs a Pre-Filter

Watch the video from the Dust Efficiency Clinic discusses how using a pre-filter will optimize your dust collection system. 

Watch Video

 

If you prefer this valuable information in white paper form, get our whitepaper, Top 5 Reasons to Use a Cyclone as a Pre-filter.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

 

 

Read More

Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

How To Determine the Cost of a Cyclone - Part 1 | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Feb 21, 2020 10:41:55 AM

When selecting the best cyclone for your process, there are many different factors that affect the sizing and cost of the cyclone.  The cyclone must be sized so that it handles the airflow of the system and components.  The proper design for the required removal efficiency must be used.  The process will also dictate the materials of construction and special requirements.  The location where the cyclone will be installed will influence the cyclone orientation.  Cyclones aren’t a stand-alone piece of equipment; support equipment is required for proper operation.  Therefore, the scope of supply will affect the cyclone costs and design.  The following is a brief description of the different elements that affect cyclone sizing and pricing.

Part 1: Airflow and Pressure Drop

The most basic (and important) thing that affects the sizing of a cyclone is the airflow the cyclone will see.  Cyclones are a mechanical separator without any moving parts.  They are designed in such a way that the more air you put through the cyclone the greater the pressure drop the air will experience going through the cyclone.  To understand this better, a quick review of how a cyclone works will be beneficial. 

Air enters a cyclone near the top of the cyclone.  The inlet is designed so the air will rotate around the walls of the cyclone heading down towards the hopper.  This creates centrifugal forces which send the heavier, larger particles out towards the walls.  Once the air gets down to the hopper, the air goes through a process called vortex reversal.  This means the air turns 180° and goes up through the middle of the cyclone.  The air outlet is located on top of the cyclone.  Often times, the air inlet of the cyclone is located on the tangential, while the cyclone outlet pipe helps form the centrifugal motion.

The greater the airflow through a cyclone the higher the pressure drop the cyclone will have.  So a cyclone will have different pressure drops for different airflows through it.  The pressure drop is not dependent on material loading or cleaning cycles.  The chart shows the pressure drop an Aerodyne GPC-24 will have at a variety of airflows.

 

When picking a cyclone for your application, you will have to figure out what pressure drop you want through the cyclone.  With a lower pressure, you will have a smaller fan and larger cyclone.  Smaller fans will have lower initial and operational costs while larger cyclones have greater initial costs.


5 Signs Your Dust Collection System Needs a Pre-Filter

Watch the video from the Dust Efficiency Clinic discusses how using a pre-filter will optimize your dust collection system. 

Watch Video

 

If you prefer this valuable information in white paper form, get our whitepaper, Top 5 Reasons to Use a Cyclone as a Pre-filter.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

 

 

Read More

Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

How Do I Pick the Correct Cyclone? | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jan 24, 2020 9:45:00 AM

When sizing a cyclone dust collector, there are many factors that have to be reviewed in order to pick the best model for your applications. Some of them are:

Airflow

What is the airflow going through the cyclone?  The cyclone size is directly tied to the amount of air going through it. The more air there is, the larger the cyclone required.  Without a doubt, this is the most important requirement for sizing a cyclone.

Temperature & pressure

The airflow volume is based on the temperature and pressure by the ideal gas law.  The cyclone need to be sized based on ACFM (actual).  Often times, customers provide SCFM (standard), which is the airflow when the temperature and pressure is 70°F and 1 atmosphere.  If SCFM is provided, then it needs to be converted to ACFM for the correct cyclone to be selected.  If not, the cyclone might be undersized, thereby increasing the pressure drop in the cyclone significantly, which can cause airflow issues.

Dust

The actual dust being collected also affects the cyclone selection.  Is the dust explosive?  What removal efficiency do you require?  What is the dust’s physical characteristics, such as does it bridge, is it sticky, is it abrasive?  All-of-these can affect the design of the cyclone.  Example, a dust that bridges might have a special hopper to help prevent bridging.

Location

The location where the cyclone will be installed has a great influence on the cyclone selection.  Is it located indoors or outdoors?  How much space is available?  Is there a height restriction? Will a vertical cyclone fit or must a horizontal cyclone be used.  Is the cyclone being used as a pre-filter or is it the final dust collection equipment? 

Fan

If this isn’t a new application, the static pressure the fan has available is extremely important.  The fan must have enough static pressure to overcome the pressure drop of the cyclone without decreasing the airflow through the system.  This may require modifying the fan, replacing the fan or installing a larger cyclone.

Material of Construction

The cyclone must be constructed of the proper materials so it doesn’t rust or react with the material going through it.  Often times the MOC will be carbon steel or a stainless steel.  Special material of construction might be used, or a coating is applied (either internal or external) to extend the cyclone’s life.

Special considerations

There are additional things that may need to be considered when selecting the cyclone.   Some examples include does it need to be cleaned often, so quick access is required?  Are special welds, material finishing, etc. required?

These are some of the main considerations that are taken into account when a cyclone is sized for a dust collection system.


The GPC Dust Collector is an efficient way to handle your dust collecting needs.

Simply click the button below to find out more about the advantages and the specifications of the Aerodyne GPC Dust Collector.

Download Specification

 



 

To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

 

 

Read More

Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

Cyclone Pre-filter Benefits – Extended filter Life | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jan 21, 2020 9:08:20 AM

A cyclone pre-filter offers multiple benefits to your dust collection system. One of these benefits and easiest to observe is extending filter life.

How Do Cyclone Dust Collectors work?

Cyclone dust collectors remove dust by using centrifugal motion.  The airflow enters the cyclone and spins around until it reverses and leaves the cyclone through the center of the vessel.  As the airflow spins, centrifugal motion pulls the dust towards the wall, leaving cleaner air in towards the center of the vessel.  So when the airflow reverses, the dust falls into the hopper while the clean air leaves through the center of the cyclone.

The larger and heavier a dust particle is, the greater the centrifugal force on it and the more likely it is to move towards the walls.  What this basically means is that the larger the particles the greater the removal of those particles in a cyclone.

A cyclone pre-filter will remove the larger particles from an airstream.  Often times this can be as much as 80-90% of the dust loading in the airflow.  Installing a cyclone pre-filter could decrease the loading on the filters by 80-90%, which in turn will allow a longer time between cleaning of the filters.

“Pulse-Jet” Baghouse   

In a “pulse-jet” baghouse the filters are cleaned by blasting compressed air through them.  This causes the filters to expand off their support.  The expansion causes the top layer(s) of dust to fall off the filters, thereby cleaning them.  Now each time the filter expands, the filter is weakened.  Over time, holes will develop in the filter, thereby allowing unfiltered air past.  This lowers the removal efficiency and could cause the system to be out of compliance.

Dust Built-Up Over Time

Another issue is over time, the top dust layers might not fully fall off.  So the total dust on the filters increases, making it harder for air to pass through.  This causes the pressure drop across the filters to increase, which will result in less air being collected at the collection points.

Installing the cyclone pre-filters decreases the dust getting to the filters, thereby requiring less cleaning (weakening of the filters) and lowering the amount of dust that builds up on the filters.  Together this can extend filter life by many months to a few years, which will lower your maintenance costs.


5 Signs Your Dust Collection System Needs a Pre-Filter

Watch the video from the Dust Efficiency Clinic discusses how using a pre-filter will optimize your dust collection system. 

Watch Video

 

If you prefer this valuable information in white paper form, get our whitepaper, Top 5 Reasons to Use a Cyclone as a Pre-filter.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

 

 

Read More

Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

Cyclone Pre-filter Benefits – Increased Removal Efficiency | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Dec 19, 2019 9:15:00 AM

A significant benefit of using a cyclonic dust collector as a pre-filter for baghouses or cartridge collectors is increasing removal efficiency. A cyclone removes all types and particle sizes of dust. At larger particle size, dust collection is nearly 100% but with smaller size (ex. sub-micron) particulate the collection can typically less than 5%.

Filter Cleaning Cycle

Filters such as bags and cartridge collectors get their high removal efficiencies by building up a dust layer over the filter.  This dust layer allows air to pass through it and the filter while preventing dust particles from passing.  As the dust layers build up, it becomes harder and harder for air to pass through, hence the increase in the pressure drop of the collector.  The filter cleaning cycle is used to remove the top layers of this dust layer; thereby allowing air to pass through easier.

Particles in the Dust Loading

When large particles are in the dust loading, they will block more passages of the air.  However, the layer may not be as uniform, thereby allowing high velocity channels that will allow the smaller particles to pass, with enough velocity to get through the filters.   If the dust loading particle sizes are more equal (smaller) then the dust layer is more uniform, letting less small particles through, thereby increasing the removal efficiency. 

Cyclone Pre-Filter

The installation of a cyclone pre-filter removes the largest particles, allowing only the smallest to pass.  This allows for a more uniform dust layer, thereby increasing the removal efficiency of the filters.

 


5 Signs Your Dust Collection System Needs a Pre-Filter

Watch the video from the Dust Efficiency Clinic discusses how using a pre-filter will optimize your dust collection system. 

Watch Video

 

If you prefer this valuable information in white paper form, get our whitepaper, Top 5 Reasons to Use a Cyclone as a Pre-filter.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

 

 

Read More

Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

A Simple Way to Check Airflow in Your Dust Collection System | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Nov 19, 2019 9:30:00 AM

Dust collection systems require the proper airflow to operate correctly.  Without the correct air flow, dust will not be removed from collection points and the collection equipment (baghouse, cartridge collectors, cyclones, etc.) will not operate with maximum efficiency. However, if too much air is being pulled through the system, a variety of issues might ensue, such as product being lost, removal efficiency lowered, utility usage increased.

Conventional Way to Measure Airflow

The normal way to measure airflow is to insert a pitot tube in the ductwork to measure the air velocity in an airstream, and then calculate the velocity (and airflow).  This is a manual process that requires a trained individual.  It is time consuming and to a certain degree an art, since the velocity in a ductwork changes depending how close to the wall you are.

Effective Way to Measure Airflow

Obviously, you cannot walk next to a piece of equipment or meter and check the velocity through the ductwork.  However, if you have a cyclone dust collector you can.  Cyclone pressure drops are based on the airflow through them.  The more air you send through a cyclone, the higher the pressure drop.  Each cyclone design has its own equation to determine pressure drop based on the airflow.  With this equation, you can estimate the airflow based on the pressure drop in your cyclone.


The GPC Dust Collector is an efficient way to handle your dust collecting needs. Simply click below for direct access to the GPC spec.

Download Specification


Exhaust Fans: The Motive Force of a Dust Collection System

In this video, Aerodyne discusses how system changes and fan performance affect your dust collection system.

Watch Video

 


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.

Read More

Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, air flow, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

Dust Re-Entrainment | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Oct 31, 2019 9:30:00 AM

The key function of a collector is to remove the maximum volume of dust from the airstream.  Additionally, an important part of the process is keeping the removed dust from re-entraining.

Baghouses and Cartridge Collectors

Baghouses and cartridge collectors collect the dust on the filters and during cleaning, the material is knocked loose and falls to the hopper.  How well the material falls to the hopper is dependent on the dust that is being collected, the can velocity (speed of air between the filters) in the baghouse, and the design of the baghouse.  

Basically, if the dust is very light and/or irregular in shape, then it might not easily fall to the hopper, instead it might float (like a leaf).  This could cause it to be re-entrained in the airflow and go back on the filter.  If the airflow is very high then the can velocity could hold up dust after cleaning, thereby causing re-entrainment of the dust.  The design of the unit can affect re-entrainment as well.  Some units have the dust coming in the unit below and at a rather high speed, which can increase dust re-entrainment.  Others will have the dust entering from the side of the filters, thereby being at a much lower velocity and out of the path of falling dust.

Cyclones

Cyclones use centrifugal force to push the particulate dust outward.  Most cyclones also use tapered walls to concentrate the dust as it gets lower in the cyclone until it falls into the hopper, while the clean air leaves the cyclone through the center.  The point where the air stops traveling down the walls and begins to travel up the center is called vortex reversal.  Depending on dust size, concentrations, and cyclone design, dust can be re-entrained by the clean air leaving the cyclone.

Wet Scrubbers

Wet Scrubbers are very good at low re-entrainment.  This is because when the dust meets a droplet, they become one larger particulate and then fall out of the airstream easier.  Most well designed wet scrubbers have a mist elimination section that will further collect droplets before leaving the collector.

 


5 Signs Your Dust Collection System Needs a Pre-Filter

Watch the video from the Dust Efficiency Clinic discusses how using a pre-filter will optimize your dust collection system. 

Watch Video

 


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

 

 

Read More

Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

Aerodyne Environmental: Home of the Horizontal Cyclone and  Vacu-Valve® Airlock Valve

Inspired To Be Different.

At Aerodyne, we choose to take a different approach to collecting dust and handling materials. Our cyclones are unique in design to address common issues such as problematic dusts and space constraints. Our airlocks are chosen to fit your specific application instead of hastily installing traditional equipment options. We believe that when we see things differently, we can solve problems effectively. That's why so many people turn to us for help in solving their tough dust problems.

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