Dust Collection and Valves Blog

Plan Your Parts and Inspections Before Plant Shutdowns | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jun 10, 2021 10:30:00 AM

Now that it is spring, it’s time to start thinking about summer shut down! If you are planning on doing maintenance on your dust collection system now is the time to order your parts.

If you are changing bags also look into doing the following:

  1. Pull your airlock off and perform any needed maintenance on it (replace bearings, change out rotors or plate, replace Vacu-Valve sleeves, etc.)
  2. Have someone check your exhaust fan a few weeks before shutdown so that if the fan needs rebalancing or bearings replaced, you can schedule it during the shutdown.
  3. Inspection of your baghouse a few months before shutdown so any damage in the housing, bad air valves, tube sheet, etc. can be replaced during the process.
  4. Inspect the ductwork and look for holes and dust buildup. Make sure dampers are working.
  5. Look into installing a cyclone pre-filter to
     
    1. Increase filter life
    2. Decrease compressed air usage
    3. Collect dust before contamination in the filters
  6. Inspect explosion protection equipment and have any chemical isolators/suppression equipment maintained. Be sure to have the clearance of the rotary valve measured to be sure it is still in compliance with NFPA requirements.
  7. Schedule a Dust Efficiency Clinic to evaluate the system performance so any modifications can be installed during plant shutdown.

Doing the above will help you revitalize your dust collection system and make sure you get the best possible performance out of it.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

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Topics: dust collector, cleaning baghouse filter, horizontal cyclone, GPC Cyclone, splitScream Cyclone, Dust Collector filters, arirflow

The Importance of a Proper Hood | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on May 21, 2021 8:45:00 AM

A dust collection system consists of four major components. The pickup hood, ductwork, dust collector, and exhaust fan. For the system to operate efficiently all four components much be sized and used correctly. Unfortunately, one of the main components (the hood) is often overlooked. The hood design is crucial for the operation of the dust collector system. And without the proper hood design, your dust collector will not provide the dust pickup required for the safety of the equipment and workers.

The hood should be designed so that it will capture the dust without letting dust escape. This can often be difficult as the hood will need to be designed to pull air from all the areas generating dust while also provide the required access of the operator / machine.

Using the wrong hood can cause:

  • Dust to escape the hood, thereby causing health, safety, and maintenance issues.
  • Too much dust is captured, removing product or components from the process.
  • Too much air is used, increasing the system size and cost.

When you are looking to install a dust collector system, pay attention the hood design of the system. Spend time selecting the proper hood for the application and don’t just go with the least expensive hood, as this could cause your entire dust collection system to fail at its job.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

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Topics: dust collector, cleaning baghouse filter, horizontal cyclone, GPC Cyclone, splitScream Cyclone, Dust Collector filters, arirflow

How Vibrators Can Help Hopper Flow? | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Apr 28, 2021 4:00:00 PM

Dust collectors have hoppers under the collection chambers to channel the dust out of the system for use or disposal. The hoppers are not designed to be used to collect and store the material, but rather as a place for the material to temporarily collect before passing through the airlock and out of the system. 

Dust Build-Up in Hopper

Depending on the material being collected and the characteristics of it, dust may temporarily build up in the hopper until it can pass through the airlock. Applications that have periodic high loading or applications that have materials with irregular shapes, are sticky, or hygroscopic could all build up in the hopper and form a bridge or rat hole by the dust discharge opening. When this happens, one of the most common solutions is to install a vibrator on the hopper.   The vibrator works by hitting the side of the walls which can cause the material to break up and fall through the dust discharge flange and leave the system.

The Purpose of Vibrator on Hopper

Vibrators can be driven pneumatically or electronically. They also can be used to continuously agitate the hopper preventing any bridging from developing, or they can be periodically turned on to break up any bridging that has developed. When you are installing a vibrator, it is important that you let the manufacturer know how you are planning on using the vibrator so they can recommend the correct vibrator for your application.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

Read More

Topics: dust collector, cleaning baghouse filter, horizontal cyclone, GPC Cyclone, splitScream Cyclone, Dust Collector filters, arirflow

Top 5 Questions to Ask When Considering A Cyclone Dust Collector

Posted by Tom Hobson on Feb 19, 2021 10:15:33 AM

Designing a dust collection system can be quite a daunting task. With so many collector options and so many application variables to consider, it is difficult to know where to begin. Cyclones are among the oldest and still most reliable methods of dust collection available. Because they require very little maintenance, have low up-front cost, and offer unmatched versatility, cyclone collectors remain a viable solution to many air-handling challenges. Although heightened environmental regulations and collection efficiency needs have shifted industry toward the use of filter-media collectors, cyclonic dust collection still plays a vital role in many air-handling systems. These five questions will help determine if a cyclone dust collector is right for your application.IMG_0688

  1. How big is my dust?

    Cyclonic dust collection relies on inertial forces to separate dust particles from an air stream. The larger and denser the particulate is, the greater its inertia. This is the reason cyclones have such high collection efficiencies when handling relatively large dust particles.

  2. How much dust is too much?

    Grain loading or dust loading refers to the amount of dust particulate that is suspended in a gas stream. This is typically measured in the number of grains per cubic foot of gas. This is an important number to consider when designing a pollution control system. Not only will this factor into the size requirement of a dust collector, but it will also determine the appropriate type of dust collector. The strict air pollution control standards in the United States often necessitate a “filter-media” dust collector, such as a bag house, for the final collection stage.

  3. Can I reuse the dust I am collecting? Particle Size

    Dust generated by handling dry bulk materials can be hazardous but also valuable. Unfortunately, most filter-type dust collection systems are designed for disposal rather than product reclamation. Filter media collectors such as cartridge filters and bag houses often do not allow collected particulates to be recovered for reuse due to contamination or particulate size issues.

  4. Do I have heat or humidity concerns?

    Air handling in manufacturing processes is often a delicate balance with a number of variables to contend with. Process heat and humidity in the air stream create a difficult challenge when it comes to dust collection. Collection of red-hot dust particulate is simply not possible with many bag houses because cotton filters are flammable and flame retardant filters can be costly.
  5. How much should I spend?

    Perhaps the most important and most difficult question asked when designing a dust collection system is how much to spend. The simple answer is, it depends. It depends on what the overall goal of the system should achieve. The best dust collection systems are those that were designed with several functions in mind: capacity, operation costs, maintenance costs, and product/ material value.


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

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Topics: dust, dust collector, cleaning baghouse filter, horizontal cyclone, GPC Cyclone, splitScream Cyclone, Dust Collector filters, arirflow

How Do I Extend the Life of My Filters? | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jan 27, 2021 3:15:00 PM

Dust collection filters such as the bags in baghouses, cartridges in cartridge collectors, and HEPA filters all filter out dust particles by collecting them in between their fibers. Dust builds up on the bags and cartridges to form a filter cake over the filter further restricting the ability of dust particles and airflow to pass through the filter. This restricting of airflow causes a pressure drop (resistance) which is directly related to the amount of dust built up on the filters. As the pressure drop increases, the airflow through the collector will decrease. Most baghouses and cartridge collectors have cleaning cycles which remove some of the dust from the filters keeping the pressure drop low.

The cleaning process on the filters usually consists of blowing higher pressure air through the filters, thereby causing it to expand slightly. This knocks off some of the top layer(s) of the filter cake which lowers the pressure drop through the filters. Other units have the filters connected to a mechanical shaking system. The airflow through the filter will be stopped during the cleaning process. The mechanical shaker system will gently shake the filters dislodging the dust to fall into the hopper.

Even with these cleaning functions, the filters will eventually plug up and significantly decrease the amount of air they allow to pass. This will starve the pickup points of airflow, allowing dust to escape and never enter the collection system. Depending on the application, this can happen within months or years of putting in new filters. The process of replacing the filters usually requires the system to be turned off. Cartridge collectors are usually easier to replace than bag, but either way the time and labor it takes to change are significant.

Ways to Extend Filter Life

It is therefore very advantageous to extend the time between filter replacements. The following are a few ways to extend filter life.

  • Install a pre-filter before the dust collector. The greater the concentration of dust getting to the filter, the faster the filter will plug up or fail. So if you can lower the dust concentration, you will extend the life of the filters. Pre-filters include cyclones and dropout boxes. Pre-filters remove most of the larger particles, leaving only the smallest to be handled by the filters.
  • Install pulse-on-demand controllers. A pulse-on-demand controller monitors the pressure drop across the filters. And when the pressure drop gets too high, the unit will activate the cleaning process until the pressure drop falls below a shutoff point. This extends life by preventing unnecessary cleaning of filters which can cause holes to develop in the filters. It also can save money on compressed air and keep the airflow within desired range.
  • Install different filters. Not all filters are the same. Some filters are designed to minimize issues with wet dust. Others have higher temperature ratings so they won’t degrade. If you are replacing filters too often, contact your filter supplier or system manufacturer to see if there are other filters that are more suitable. These special filters are more expensive, so it might be prudent to look at adding a pre-filter and pulse-on-demand controller to extend life even further at the same time.
  • If you are plugging up the filters with hygroscopic dust, check the collector housing for leaks that might allow humidity into it. Also, check the compressed air supply to make sure humidity isn’t being added to the system.
  • Install insulation on the dust collector if you have high humidity. Insulation will help prevent water vapor from condensing at night or during winter, thereby preventing water droplets from damaging the filters or causing dust to plug up in the filters.
  • Install a spark arrester before the dust collector. Depending on the process being vented, sparks can be pulled into the dust collector which, thereby cause the filters to catch on fire. Installing a spark arrester prevents this. Often times a pre-filter (cyclone or dropout box) provide the same protection.

If you are replacing filters too often then think about making some of the above changes to your system next time you are due to replace filters. That way you can extend your filter life and operate for longer periods of time without maintenance.

 


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

Read More

Topics: dust collector, cleaning baghouse filter, horizontal cyclone, GPC Cyclone, splitScream Cyclone, Dust Collector filters, arirflow

Cleaning Baghouse Filter Could Be A Bad Thing?

Posted by Tom Hobson on Apr 26, 2018 9:15:00 AM

While not cleaning your baghouse filter is bad, cleaning your filters too much isn’t a very good idea either.  If you don’t clean your filters enough, dust will build up on them faster and they will plug up faster; however, cleaning them too much can cause issues too.

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Topics: dust collector, cartridge collector, cleaning baghouse filter, baghouse filter

Aerodyne Environmental: Home of the Horizontal Cyclone and  Vacu-Valve® Airlock Valve

Inspired To Be Different.

At Aerodyne, we choose to take a different approach to collecting dust and handling materials. Our cyclones are unique in design to address common issues such as problematic dusts and space constraints. Our airlocks are chosen to fit your specific application instead of hastily installing traditional equipment options. We believe that when we see things differently, we can solve problems effectively. That's why so many people turn to us for help in solving their tough dust problems.

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