Dust Collection and Valves Blog

It’s a New Year…Have You Checked Your Dust Collector??

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jan 16, 2018 3:19:10 PM

A simple dust collection system is composed of the exhaust fan, dust collector (cyclone, baghouse, cartridge collector, wet scrubber, etc.), ductwork, and hoods.  An issue with one of these components could cause your dust collection system to fail or not work as designed.  However, the dust collector is usually the most complex component and the most likely to develop issues, but is often the most neglected.  Just like an automobile, proper maintenance of a dust collector could save a whole lot of issues in the future.

A variety of issues can develop in the operation of dust collectors.  We will discuss baghouses specifically, but cartridge collectors have very similar issues, while cyclones and wet scrubbers have their own set of items that need attention.

Plugged filters.  Bag Filters are the primary component in dust collection.  If they aren’t operating correctly, the dust collection will not be operating properly.  The filters can fail if they get plugged up or develop holes.  When plugged up, they will not let the proper amount of air through, which will cause the airflow through the system to decline; thereby, picking up less dust at the pickup points.  Plugged filters can be spotted by monitoring the pressure drop across the bags or noticing less air movement at the pickup points.  When filters are plugged up, they should be replaced and quickly. 

Holes in the bag filters allow dust past the filters; thereby, decreasing the removal efficiency in the system.  This can cause you to violate your EPA permit, cause damage to the exhaust fan and/or cause issues with the neighbors.  Holes in the filters can be spotted by bag break monitors, stack testing, or noticing dust in the exhaust.  When bags are broken they should be replaced, however, it is often difficult to identify which bag has the hole so often times multiple (if not all) bags should be replaced.

Inspect these other components.  Baghouses also contain many supplementary items that help them operate effectively.  These can also develop issues which causes the system to fail.  These items include solenoid valves, poppet valves, control panel, bag support cages and venturi, diffuser, hopper and airlocks. These items should be inspected, cleaned and components replaced if necessary.

Other factors to consider:  Failure in the cleaning system will cause high pressure drop.  Damage to the cages could cause holes in the bags.  Damage to the diffuser will cause some bags to plug up faster than others.  Damage to the hopper or excess dust in the hopper will cause higher dust concentrations that decreases removal efficiency.  An inoperative or inappropriate airlock will cause dust build up in the hopper and/or air leakage.

A yearly inspection of your baghouse will help you identify these issues before they develop. This will help your dust collection system operate at peak efficiency and as it was designed.  And as with your automobile, preventative maintenance ends up saving you money in the long run.  If your baghouse stops operating you will have to do an emergency repair or, as is most often the case, it will gradually decrease in its efficiency without you noticing. You will then be wasting your money on operating a system that isn’t effective.  And if you are inspected, you could be fined.

If you are having operational issues on your dust collection system, contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com or click the button below.

Make Appointment

Read More

Topics: dust, Dust Efficiency Clinic, Plugged Filters, Holes in Bag Filters

Why Do I Need an Airlock Valve for My Dust Collector

Posted by Tom Hobson on Nov 29, 2017 3:38:54 PM

In order for a dust collector to operate at its peak performance, the hopper has to be isolated from the outside.  This means either the dust bin/receptacle is “hard connected”, meaning there are no air leaks or an airlock is used.  An airlock isolates the dust collector hopper from the outside, while allowing the collected dust to exit the system.  Common airlocks are rotary valves, trickle valves, double dump valves, and knife gates.  Some airlocks are low leakage (double dump valve and trickle valves) while others have continuous leakage (rotary valves). 

Airlocks are important because without them air will enter (system under vacuum) or leave (pressurized system) through the dust discharge valve.  If the system is under vacuum, the air entering the system from the dust discharge will re-entrain the dust back into the clean air, thereby lowering removal efficiency.  If the system is under pressure, air will blow out of the bottom, spreading dust everywhere, creating unnecessary maintenance cost for the facility.

If the system is dealing with an explosive dust, an airlock should be used to prevent an explosion from propagating from the dust discharge flange.  Specially designed rotary valves are used to prevent this.

Furthermore, airlocks allow you to change the dust bin without shutting off the system.  If you don’t have an airlock, when you need to change your dust bin, you either have to turn off the system, or operate the unit without any isolation. 

So when you are spending money to capture your dust in a dust collector, don’t forget to put an airlock on it, so you will have the best performance possible.

Read our article on what type of airlock valves to use in particular applications.

Get Whitepaper NOW

If you are having operational issues on your dust collection system, contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com.

Read More

Topics: dust, gpc, airlocks, airlocks valve

Why You Should Pay Attention to Air Velocity in Your Dust Collection System

Posted by Tom Hobson on Nov 21, 2017 10:04:33 AM

If your air velocity is too low in your ductwork you could get dust dropping out in straight runs.  And dust collecting in ductwork is not a very good idea. 

  • It is a fire / explosion hazard. If your system has a low dust loading, small enough that there isn’t enough material to support an explosion (below MEC), dust collecting in the ductwork could put the system above the MEC, thereby making the system an explosion hazard.
  • Dust collecting in the ductwork causes the effective diameter of the ductwork to decrease. This causes the pressure drop through the system to increase, which will decrease the airflow through the system.  Lower airflow will cause more dust to escape the pickup hoods, thereby causing greater housekeeping, maintenance, etc.
  • Dust building up in ductwork will also cause your ductwork to weigh much more. Depending on the weight the supports were designed for, if too much dust builds up, your ductwork could fall down, thereby possibly creating a dust cloud that could be explosive.

If the air velocity is too high, the static pressure of your system will be high.  This will require you to operate the exhaust fan at a higher speed.  This could increase the noise, power used and wear and tear.  High air velocity could also increase the erosion of the ductwork, thereby developing holes in the ductwork which will leak air into the system and decrease the actual airflow at the pickup points.

Get Your Dust Evaluation

Watch for our upcoming article on sizing of ductwork for your dust collection system.

If you are having operational issues on your dust collection system, contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com.
Read More

Topics: dust, gpc, Fan Wheels, Fan Impellers, velocity, air velocity

Dust Collection Systems: Instrumentation 101 - Differential Pressure Gages

Posted by Tom Hobson on Mar 20, 2017 9:01:00 AM

A dust collection system is much more than just the dust collector (ex. Cyclone, baghouse, cartridge collector, wet scrubber, etc.).  It constitutes the exhaust fan, hoods, instrumentation and interconnecting ductwork.  If any of these components are improperly sized or operating, the whole system can fail in its primary objective, dust collection.

Today we are discussing the differential pressure gage.  The differential pressure gage is an often overlooked piece of equipment on dust collectors, especially cyclones.  By measuring the differential pressure across your dust collector, you are monitoring your system performance.  If the differential pressure gage suddenly changes, it is telling you something has recently changed in your system.  If you see a gradual change in the differential pressure, then it is telling you that the system is gradually changing.

A sudden change is telling you that the airflow has suddenly increased or decreased.  This could be caused by a variety of reason (plugging of filters, opening of damper, closing of damper, etc.)  When you see this happen, your removal efficiency will be affected.  So it’s better to start identifying the issue before you are forced to.

A gradual change is telling you that the ductwork or filters are starting to plug up.  This could be normal operating conditions or caused by a change in process.  When you notice a gradual change in the pressure drop, schedule a maintenance inspection before it gets too drastic.  That way you won’t be forced shut down in an emergency.

If you are having operational issues on your dust collection system, contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com.

Read More

Topics: dust, gpc, Pressure Gages, Sudden change in airflow

Dust Collection Systems: Fan Wheels 101

Posted by Tom Hobson on Mar 8, 2017 9:01:00 AM

A dust collection system is much more than just the dust collector (ex. Cyclone, baghouse, cartridge collector, wet scrubber, etc.).  It constitutes the exhaust fan, hoods, instrumentation and interconnecting ductwork.  If any of these components are improperly sized or operating, the whole system can fail in its primary objective, dust collection.

Today we are discussing the exhaust fan.  The exhaust fan could be the most important component in the dust collection system.  It provides the motive force for the whole system.  If it isn’t performing as required, the system will fail.  The proper fan impeller (wheel) must be used if the fan is to operate correctly.

There are three types of wheels/impellers:

  • Radial wheel (Ex. open material handling and material handling) - These wheels should be used when the fan is on the dirty side of a dust collector or after a dust collector where a large amount of dust remains in the airstream (ex. after drop out box). The wheel is designed so it can handle dust in the air.  The open type wheel is used when there is a high dust loading and/or the dust is fibrous.  Its design helps prevent the dust from wrapping around the wheel.
  • Air handling wheel – The air handling wheel is designed for clean airstreams or extremely light dust loading. These wheels should always be used on the clean side of and dust collector and never on the dirty side.  They are usually more efficient in air movement than the radial wheels.
  • Axial wheel – These wheels are usually never used on dust collection systems. They will move a lot of air, but without much force behind them.  If possible, stay away from axial fans on your dust collector system.

If you are having issues with the fan on your dust collector, check the wheel.  Make sure you are using the proper type.    

Find out more at Dust Efficiency Clinic.

Dust Efficiency Clinic

If you are having operational issues on your dust collection system, contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com.

Read More

Topics: dust, gpc, Fan Wheels, Fan Impellers

Pharmaceutical Industry: What’s Aerodyne GPC Cyclone got to do with it?

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jan 12, 2017 8:46:52 AM

The pharmaceutical industry has unique requirements that normal industrial applications do not have.  Whether it’s the strict FDA rules or the flexibility of batch production, normal industrial practices and equipment don’t always apply.  Even with continuous production becoming more popular, pharmaceutical applications are different than standard industrial applications.

Read More

Topics: cyclone, dust, gpc, pharmaceutical

Vacu-Valve on a 30-day trial? Are you kidding? Try it NOW…

Posted by Tom Hobson on Dec 21, 2016 10:33:30 AM

The Vacu-Valve is a low cost alternative to a rotary valve.  There are no motors, pneumatics, or moving parts as it operates by using the system vacuum above to seal the sleeve.  This is typically from a cyclone, baghouse, or cartridge collector.  Since the sleeve is split, gravity will slowly pull the solids down through the sleeve until they exit the sleeve and fall into the collection hopper.  As you can see from the description, not all solids will easily pass through this.  The ideal particulate would be sand.  It’s small, spherical shape and the density allows it to easily pass through the valve.  It doesn’t bridge easily.

Read More

Topics: cyclone, dust, dust collector, baghouse, cartridge, airflow

Choosing a Collector: When to Use a Baghouse, Cartridge Collector, a Cyclone or a Wet Scrubber

Posted by Tom Hobson on Sep 26, 2016 9:39:13 AM

 

Read More

Topics: cyclone, dust, dust collector, baghouse, cartridge, wet scrubber

Choosing a Collector: When to Use a Baghouse, Cartridge Collector, a Cyclone or a Wet Scrubber

Posted by Tom Hobson on Sep 14, 2016 8:30:00 AM

Choosing the right dust collection solution requires careful evaluation of the specific application.

Read More

Topics: cyclone, dust, dust collector, guide, baghouse, cartridge, wet scrubber

Silica Legislation: What You Need To Know

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jun 8, 2016 10:00:00 AM

OSHA attributes a good amount of illnesses and deaths to exposure to silica dust, having been proven to carcinogenic and a cause of untreatable silicosis, which creates a distinct lesion in the lungs. OSHA also hasn’t updated its laws regarding silica exposure since 1971. As such, OSHA plans to do something about it.

Read More

Topics: regulations, dust, OSHA, silica dust, dust collector, silica

Aerodyne Environmental: Home of the Horizontal Cyclone and  Vacu-Valve® Airlock Valve

Inspired To Be Different.

At Aerodyne, we choose to take a different approach to collecting dust and handling materials. Our cyclones are unique in design to address common issues such as problematic dusts and space constraints. Our airlocks are chosen to fit your specific application instead of hastily installing traditional equipment options. We believe that when we see things differently, we can solve problems effectively. That's why so many people turn to us for help in solving their tough dust problems.

Subscribe Here!

Recent Posts

Posts by topics

See all