Dust Collection and Valves Blog

Dust Collection System: Confined Space Entry | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Dec 10, 2019 9:30:00 AM

Cleaning cyclones is often difficult.  Traditional cyclones are tall with long sloping hoppers.  Access to them is often limited due to the geometry of the cyclone.  Large cyclones require confined space entry and special hardware once inside to clean the sides.  Smaller units can be disassembled, but they require you to disconnect the cyclone from connected ductwork and valves for disassembly.

 

OSHA Special Procedures Requirement                                           

OSHA requires companies to have special procedures for “confined space entry”.  Equipment that is large enough for an employee to enter fully and is not designed for continuous occupancy and has limited or restricted means of entry or exit is considered confined space.  If a person has to go inside, they often require a “permit to enter”.  This could include having a dedicated person outside.  While if the worker only needs to reach inside, the requirements may not require as stringent precaution or possibly even a permit. 

Horizontal Cyclones – Removable Backplate

However, horizontal cyclones (as manufactured by Aerodyne Environmental) have a removable backplate.  This allows access to the cyclone internals without disassembly and disconnecting of the cyclone.  Small and medium size units also allow access without having to fully go inside the cyclone.  Many units are small enough that normal humans can’t even fully enter.  So full confined space entry procedure may not be required.  The company’s confined space entry policy should be review to see what is required.


GPC Dust Collector Spec Request

The GPC Dust Collector is an efficient way to handle your dust collecting needs.

 

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Dust Collection Deathmatch: Baghouse vs. Cartridge

Trying to decide whether to use a cartridge collector or baghouse in your dust collection system? Find out the four factors that separate the baghouses and dust cartridges.

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To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com

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Topics: dust collector, airlocks valve, horizontal cyclone, compact cyclones, confined space

Rectangular Airlocks: The Better Rotary Valves | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Nov 25, 2019 10:15:00 AM

Dust collectors often have issues with dust bridging in the hopper. 

Round or Square Airlocks

The standard dust collector design uses round or square airlocks to remove the dust from the hopper.  These designs are great for standard dust that doesn’t bridge.  They are easy to fabricate, thereby keeping cost low.  However, the uniform dimensions of the flange allow the dust to be equally supported on all sides, creating a more stable environment for a dust bridge to form.  One way to counteract this is by over-sizing your airlock. An example would be using a 12” rotary valve instead of an 8” valves.  While oversizing the airlock lowers the chance of bridge forming.  A bridge can still form due to shape of the flange. 

Better Airlocks: Rectangular Rotary Valve

A better way would be to use a rectangular rotary valve.  Since the rotary valve has a rectangular flange, dust trying to bridge over the opening isn’t equally supported.  And any bridge trying to form across the long axis will be unstable and begin to bow down into the valve opening, where the rotors will grab them and destroy the bridge, allowing the free flow of dust out of the hopper.


Bridging Dust?

Try the Aerodyne Mighty Whopper.

Aerodyne’s Mighty Whopper rotary valve has over-sized rectangular inlet and outlet. 

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5 Signs Your Dust Collection System Needs Maintenance

Is your dust collection system working at peak efficiency? A quick, do-it-yourself examination may identify symptoms that your system needs a check-up.

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To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com

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Topics: dust collector, airlocks valve, compact cyclones, Rectangular airlocks, Mighty Whopper

A Simple Way to Check Airflow in Your Dust Collection System | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Nov 19, 2019 9:30:00 AM

Dust collection systems require the proper airflow to be operating correctly.  If not enough air is going through the system, dust isn’t being properly removed from the collection points and the dust collection equipment (baghouse, cartridge collectors, cyclones, etc.) might not be operating correctly.  However, if too much air is being pulled through the system, a variety of issues might ensue, such as product being lost, removal efficiency lowered, utility usage increased.

Conventional Way to Measure Airflow

The normal way to measure airflow is to insert a pitot tube in the ductwork to measure the air velocity in an airstream, and then calculate the velocity (and airflow).  This is a manual process that requires a trained individual.  It is time consuming and to a certain degree an art, since the velocity in a ductwork changes depending how close to the wall you are.

Effective Way to Measure Airflow

Obviously, you cannot walk next to a piece of equipment or meter and check the velocity through the ductwork.  However, if you have a cyclone dust collector you can.  Cyclone pressure drops are based on the airflow through them.  The more air you send through a cyclone, the higher the pressure drop.  Each cyclone design has its own equation to determine pressure drop based on the airflow.  With this equation, you can estimate the airflow based on the pressure drop in your cyclone.


The GPC Dust Collector is an efficient way to handle your dust collecting needs. Simply click below for direct access to the GPC spec.

Download Specification


Exhaust Fans: The Motive Force of a Dust Collection System

In this video, Aerodyne discusses how system changes and fan performance affect your dust collection system.

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To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.

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Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, air flow, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

Dust Re-Entrainment | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Oct 31, 2019 9:30:00 AM

The key in a dust collector is to remove as much dust as possible from the airstream.  However, another very important part of this is to keep that dust out of the airstream so it doesn’t re-entrain. 

Baghouses and Cartridge Collectors

Baghouses and cartridge collectors collect the dust on the filters and during cleaning, the material is knocked loose and falls to the hopper.  How well the material falls to the hopper is dependent on the dust that is being collected, the can velocity (speed of air between the filters) in the baghouse, and the design of the baghouse.  

Basically, if the dust is very light and/or irregular in shape, then it might not easily fall to the hopper, instead it might float (like a leaf).  This could cause it to be re-entrained in the airflow and go back on the filter.  If the airflow is very high then the can velocity could hold up dust after cleaning, thereby causing re-entrainment of the dust.  The design of the unit can affect re-entrainment as well.  Some units have the dust coming in the unit below and at a rather high speed, which can increase dust re-entrainment.  Others will have the dust entering from the side of the filters, thereby being at a much lower velocity and out of the path of falling dust.

Cyclones

Cyclones use centrifugal force to push the particulate dust outward.  Most cyclones also use tapered walls to concentrate the dust as it gets lower in the cyclone until it falls into the hopper, while the clean air leaves the cyclone through the center.  The point where the air stops traveling down the walls and begins to travel up the center is called vortex reversal.  Depending on dust size, concentrations, and cyclone design, dust can be re-entrained by the clean air leaving the cyclone.

Wet Scrubbers

Wet Scrubbers are very good at low re-entrainment.  This is because when the dust meets a droplet, they become one larger particulate and then fall out of the airstream easier.  Most well designed wet scrubbers have a mist elimination section that will further collect droplets before leaving the collector.

 


5 Signs Your Dust Collection System Needs a Pre-Filter

Watch the video from the Dust Efficiency Clinic discusses how using a pre-filter will optimize your dust collection system. 

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To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

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Topics: dust collector, Dust Efficiency Clinic, compact cyclones, Dust Collector filters, Cyclones pre-filter, Dust Re-Entrainment

Clean on Demand Controller | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Oct 28, 2019 10:22:11 AM

Simple Timers

For many years, pulse-jet baghouses were cleaned by simple timers.  The timers would start the cleaning cycle every so many minutes.  You would be able to change how often your filters are cleaned by changing the time between each cleaning.  This design makes sure that the filters are cleaned regularly, whether they need to be cleaned or not.  The main issue with this is that every time a filter is cleaned, it increases the chances of it failing.  Filters are cleaned by pulsing high pressure air into the filter.  This expands the filter, which causes the top layers of dust to fall off.  But that expansion can also cause holes or rips in the filters.

Pulse-On-Demand Controller

So it would be beneficial to minimize the cleaning of the filters to only when it’s needed.  The pulse-on-demand controller does just this.  It measures the pressure drop across the filters.  When the pressure drop gets over a certain amount, it will begin the cleaning process.  Many of these controllers also have “bag break” technology, which will tell you when one of the filters has a hole.  You will then be able to replace the filters only when they are needed.  Some controllers can even isolate the row where the broken bag is located, so you won’t have to replace all the filters.

Installing a Clean-on-Demand controller, “bag break” technology, and cyclone pre-filters (Check out other Aerodyne blogs for more info) can help you decrease the maintenance on your filters, extend filter life, and lower operating costs (less air usage).

 


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

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Topics: dust collector, airlocks, pre-filter, arirflow, pulse-on-demand controller

Aerodyne Vacu-Valve ® vs. Traditional Rotary Valve | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Sep 30, 2019 2:15:00 PM

Do the rotary valves under your dust collectors cause maintenance headaches?  Are they clogging?  Are you having to drop everything and assign extra labor to fix them?

The disadvantages of Rotary Valve

Most dust collectors are equipped with a motor-driven rotary airlock valve that empties contents from the hoppers. Rotary valves have been used for many years and are probably the most widely used airlock design. However, maintaining rotary valves is difficult and time consuming. These valves run continuously, regardless if dust is present, which leads to wasted electricity. In addition, the valves can wear out rapidly, resulting in costly repairs and replacements.

Best Alternative: Aerodyne Vacu-Valve ®

A highly cost-effective alternative is Aerodyne’s Vacu-Valve ®  Trickle Valve System. The Vacu-Valve relies on the negative pressure of the material handling system to hold the duckbill sleeve closed. As the dust or material builds up, the sleeve is forced open, allowing the contents to discharge. Once emptied, the negative pressure then immediately closes the duckbill again. This trickle valve system requires no lubrication, power, or controls. Materials that would normally jam or wear out a rotary airlock valve, the Vacu-Valve handles with ease. There is a variety of duckbill sleeve options designed for specific applications; and the Aerodyne Vacu-Valve ® is available in an open or closed design, to further accommodate the particular application.

Aerodyne’s Vacu-Valve ® is the solution! Have a look at this infographic and to learn how the Vacu-valve solves these issues and improves the discharge efficiency of your baghouse, filters and cyclones.

Vacu-Valve is a Simpler Solution

 


How Do Vacu-Valve Dust Valves Work?



To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

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Topics: dust collector, rotary valves, trickle valve, airlocks, airlocks valve, aerodyne vacu-valve

Horizontal Cyclones: Solution to Space Limitation | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Sep 30, 2019 10:30:30 AM

If you are like many plant engineers who are working within the confines of a limited work space, rest assured that you don’t need to compromise on the efficiency of your industrial dust collection system. A traditional, high-efficiency cyclone is not the best solution for facilities with low ceilings.

Space Limitation

If space limitations prevent you from properly orienting this type of cyclone in an upright position, this will result in a loss of efficiency due to particulate settling on the side of the collector and being carried out with the exhaust gas. Attempting to solve this problem by installing your vertically oriented dust collection cyclone outdoors may encourage condensation that can shorten service life and reduce efficiency.

Horizontal Cyclones

Today, more plant engineers are choosing a horizontal configuration for reliable, high-efficiency dust collection. These options include the Aerodyne GPC Cyclone and counter-cyclonic dust collectors, such as the Aerodyne SplitStream™ Dust Collector.  The SplitStream™ Dust Collector uses a secondary air stream that directs material toward the collection hopper, and may be installed horizontally with virtually no loss of efficiency.

Because this design does not rely on gravity to bring the dust to the hopper like conventional cyclones, its operational efficiency is not affected by horizontal installation. In addition, this type of dust collection system may be suspended from a ceiling, conserving valuable space on the manufacturing floor.

The SplitStream™ Dust Collector the ability to increase/decrease process temperature while collecting dust. The unique counter cyclonic design element of the SplitStream™ Dust Collector ensures that a minimal amount of particulate comes in contact with the interior walls. This eliminates excessive wear and enables abrasive particulate collection.

 


How Do Horizontal Dust Collectors Work?



To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

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Topics: dust collector, NFPA 652, horizontal cyclone, GPC Cyclone, splitScream Cyclone, arirflow

Level Switches in Dust Collector Hoppers | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Aug 30, 2019 8:23:41 AM

As maintenance staffs become smaller and have less time to do preventative maintenance, technology needs to step in and help. 

Level Switches

That is where level switches in dust collector hoppers fit in.  An airlock works by allowing dust from the dust collector to leave the vessel while preventing air from leaking in or out of the system.  Some airlocks operate by emptying the hopper as soon as dust falls and some require a buildup above them to help seal the valve and provide motive force. 

The main thing is, that dust often times will not constantly be falling through the valve.  This means that walking next to a vessel won’t always tell you if the airlock is operating correctly. 

Installing a level switch in the hopper will help.  The level switch measures the amount of material in the hopper and if too much is in the hopper it will provide a signal (alarm).  This will tell maintenance that the airlock is not operating correctly and it needs to be investigated.  Depending on the system’s controls, the alarm can be a local alarm (light and/or horn) or feed into the central computer.


Dust collection systems can range from being fairly simple to extremely complex. 

It’s important to know that you have the proper system for your application. Some questions always come up when looking at dust collection systems.

To make life easier, we have put together some common questions we get asked along with answers and explanations. Have a look.

Volume 1: Get FAQ Now 

Volume 2: Get FAQ Now

 


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

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Topics: dust collector, airlocks, explosive dust, maintenance cost, arirflow, lead switch

Heavy Dust Loading Leads to High Maintenance in Dust Collector | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Aug 23, 2019 3:31:39 PM

Heavy dust loading in the dust collector leads to high maintenance dust collectors.  Since most dust collectors are fabric filters (baghouse, cartridge collectors, shakers, etc.), heavy dust loading will cause/require high frequency of cleaning of the filters.  Most filters are cleaned by injecting high pressure air into the clean side, causing the filters to expand a bit.  This causes dust to fall off the filters.  Filters wear out due to the frequent expanding and contracting.  So the more often you have to clean a filter, the faster the filters will wear out.

Pleated Filters

This is made even worse if the filters are pleated.  Pleated filters have valleys and ridges which increase the surface area available for air to diffuse through the filter.  However, high dust loading can cause the pleated filter valleys to fill up and not properly clean during a cleaning cycle.  This will severely restrict the surface area available for airflow, which will lead to higher velocities through the filters.  A higher velocity increases the chances of dust getting through the filters.  This can cause holes to develop in the filter.  It can also cause dust to plug a pathway through the filter, thereby further restricting airflow.  It can also cause a decrease in removal efficiency.

So if you have high dust loading in your dust collector, it might be beneficial to install a pre-filter to increase filter life and make maintenance much less of a hassle.


Pre-filtering may reduce operating and maintenance costs by extending bag or filter life and improving removal efficiencies. This video discusses five warning signs that your dust collection system needs a pre-filter.

If you prefer this valuable information in white paper form, get our whitepaper, Top 5 Reasons to Use a Cyclone as a Pre-filter.

Get Whitepaper


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.



To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

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Topics: dust collector, combustible dust, NFPA 652, explosive dust, heavy dust loading, maintenance cost, arirflow

Is Your Dust Explosive? | Aerodyne

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jul 31, 2019 9:45:00 AM

To help answer this question, NFPA has released NFPA-652 and 654. A combustible dust is defined as a finely divided combustible particulate solid that presents a flash fire or explosion hazard when suspended in air or the process-specific oxidizing medium over a range of concentrations. Basically, what this means is when the dust is in the air and its concentration is enough to cause a flash fire or propagate a deflagration or explosion if exposed to a spark or heat source, then it’s considered combustible.

Combustible Dust Testing

Unless you know for sure that your dust isn’t combustible, you should send the dust sample to a lab for testing. The lab will provide one of three responses – no reaction, combustible but not propagating, or propagating. 

Usually the lab will initially do a Go/ No-Go test. If the dust doesn’t exhibit combustion, the testing will stop. If it does exhibit combustion, they will then do further tests and provide explosion properties ( Kst and Pmax) of the dust. The Kst tells you how quickly the explosion will propagate, while Pmax tells you the power behind the event.

 

Common Knowledge about Combustible Dust

  1. A combustible dust mixed with non-combustible dust may or may not pass the go / no-go test; therefore, if you have both in a mixture, get a test.
  2. Material that may not burn can still be combustible as a dust, unless you know for sure, getting a test is the safe bet.
  3. If you have made a process change that changes the composition, relative concentrations, etc. of the dust, then the combustibility of the dust may have changed and a new test should be done.
  4. If you have combustible dust in your facility, then a hazard analysis of the area must be done every five years.

 


Dust Collector FAQ Volume 1

To make life easier, we have put together some common questions we get asked along with answers and explanations. Have a look.

Get FAQ Now


To learn more about which dust collector, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.dustcollectorhq.com.


To improve efficiency and safety, there is no substitute for an on-site inspection by an experienced expert. Click below to start with a free 20-minute phone consultation by clicking the button.

Free Consultation

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Topics: dust collector, combustible dust, NFPA 652, explosive dust

Aerodyne Environmental: Home of the Horizontal Cyclone and  Vacu-Valve® Airlock Valve

Inspired To Be Different.

At Aerodyne, we choose to take a different approach to collecting dust and handling materials. Our cyclones are unique in design to address common issues such as problematic dusts and space constraints. Our airlocks are chosen to fit your specific application instead of hastily installing traditional equipment options. We believe that when we see things differently, we can solve problems effectively. That's why so many people turn to us for help in solving their tough dust problems.

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